(one’s) “Meat And Potatoes” – (Idiomatic Adjectival Phrasal-Noun)

(one’s) “Meat And Potatoes”

(Closet Classics #10)


Meat And Potatoes - GiveMeSomeEnglish!!!


Not only is this a term which describes, literally, thousands upon thousands of delicious meal possibilities, served in just as many different ways – but it is also a common Idiomatic Adjectival Phrasal-Noun.


tO Find OUt Why It Has Nothing To Do With The Picture Above…

Read The Full Post Here!

(I Promise…  No Click-Bait.   Just Some Meaty English Goodness That You Can Really Sink Your Mental Teeth Into)

😛


Have An Excellent Day!

😉

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“Put The Horse In Front Of The Cart” – English Aphorism


(to) Put The Horse In Front Of The Cart

(Today’s “Tid-Bit”)


Put The Horse In Front Of The Cart - GiveMeSomeEnglish!!!


The Aphorism “Put The Horse In Front Of The Cart” – is an Idiomatic expression which can also be classified as an Interjection, A Proverb and a Saying.  Furthermore, this phrase can also be turned into a Prepositional Phrasal Verb.

It is very similar in meaning to the Idiomatic Aphorism:  (to) “Build The House From The Ground Up” – both of which mean:


To Find Out The Difference …

Read The Full Post Here


Have An Excellent Day!

(And Don’t Get Ahead Of Yourself…  Or The Cart)

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“Some” vs “Any” – Quantifiers – (Grammar Lesson)

The Quantifiers, “Some” vs “Any”

(Grammar Lesson)


The use of these Quantifiers – “Some” vs “Any” are used with both Countable and Un-Countable Nouns, and are often used in very similar sentences.

They can be used to refer to a non-specific amount of one, all, every, some, none, or a non-specific type of the noun they are referring to.


To See How They Relate To Slamming Beers With your Friends…


Some vs Any (Beers With Friends) - GiveMeSomeEnglish!!!


Or, a couple of girls doing some awesome Kung Fu moves…


Some vs Any (Kung Fu) - GiveMeSomeEnglish!!!


Read The Full Post Here!

(Or risk the loss of beer and the addition of a backwards kick right in the face…  Just kidding.  But you should still read it anyways.)


Have An Excellent Day!

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Concerned vs Worried


(To Be)

“Concerned” vs “Worried”


Both of these words, in this form, are Stative Verbs, which describe very similar states.  In fact, if you look them up in various dictionaries, you will probably find that each word is defined with the other.  However, this is not actually correct.


To Find Out Why…

Read The Full Post Here

(I Promise, There Is Nothing To Be Concerned Or Worried About…  This is Not Click-Bait)

Worried - GiveMeSomeEnglish!!!001


You can find more similar words that are commonly mistaken on the “This” vs “That” Page of The GiveMeSomeEnglish!!! – Lexis Portal


Have An Excellent Day!

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“Today’s Tid-Bit” – The Word “Mug”


(Word Of The Day)  “Mug”


(This post is a re-fresh of one of the first posts that was ever published on GiveMeSomeEnglish!!!… and as such, had fallen down such a deep crack, that it took three years to find it after many many re-arrangements of the entire GiveMeSomeEnglish!!! Universe.  So, here it is again, up-dated, and rejuvenated for your entertainment and learning pleasure.)


Get Mugged - GiveMeSomeEnglish!!!


Read The Full Post Here!

(Or You’re Gonna Get “Mugged”!!!…  I’m Kidding, You Can Read It If You Want To…  Or Don’t)


Have An Excellent Day!

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(to be able to) “Afford” (something)


– (to be able to) “Afford” (something) –


According to many dictionaries, to be able to Afford something simply means: to have enough money to pay for it.  However, this is an incredibly over-simplified definition, which is ultimately not true.


Ghetto-fabulous - GiveMeSomeEnglish!!!


To Find Out The Full Story…

Read The Full Story Here

(I Promise No Click-Bait…  Just Truth)


Have An Excellent Day!

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Aphorism: “We’ll Cross That Bridge When We Come To It”


“We’ll Cross That Bridge When We Come To It”

(Aphorism)


Today’s “Tid-Bit” is an idiomatic aphorism which is used to calm someone who is worried about some situation in the future, when there is absolutely nothing that can be done about it in the present – and that simply worrying about it, either does no good, or can potentially be detrimental to the present situation.


“Oh My Gosh!  I just found out that a comet could hit the Earth and bring the destruction of civilization as we know it!!!

What Are We Gonna DOOOOOOOOOOO!!!?!?!?!!???!?!??!?!?

~

Well, there’s nothing we can do about it now…  We’ll cross that bridge when we come to it.”

We'll Cross That Bridge When We Come To It - GiveMeSomeEnglish!!!

(“Damn… No Place To Skate”)


For more examples and an explanation of how to properly use this phrase…

READ THE FULL POST HERE

(I Promise, No Click Bait…  That Is A Bridge I Never Want To Cross)


Have An Excellent Day!

😉

Industry Terminology – (one’s) “Higher-Ups”


(one’s) “Higher-Ups”

(Industry Terminology)


Today’s “Tid-Bit” comes from the “Industry Terminology” section of the GiveMeSomeEnglish!!! – Lexis Portal and also happens to fall in the category of “Yer Ing-Glish Sux!!!”.

The idiomatic Phrasal-Noun (one’s) Higher-Ups is an old phrase used to describe the people in an organization, or company which have authority over others.  Unfortunately this phrase has also been around long enough that some people use this phrase to talk about members of society in the same way.


Higher-Ups - GiveMeSomeEnglish!!!


To Find Out Why This Term SUX!!!…

READ THE FULL POST HERE!

(No Click-Bait…  Just Truth)


Have An Excellent Day!

😉

“Today’s Tid-Bit” – (to be) Clear-Cut


“…Clear-Cut…”

(Idiomatic Phrasal-Adjectival)


Today’s “Tid-Bit”:  (to be)*Clear-Cut* (as in: a decision / an answer / some information) is an idiomatic Phrasal-Adjective which means:  Something which is very is very “clear” / understandable / simple / decisive / etc. without the possibility for the decision / answer / information to be mis-construed or mis-understood in any way.


“He made a very *clear-cut* decision.”


Clear-Cut - GiveMeSomeEnglish!!!


“When George made the mistake of asking The Soup Nazi for a piece of free bread to go with his soup, not only was refused the bread but The Soup Nazi  made the *clear-cut* decision to refuse George ANY kind of service.”


For An Explanation With Plenty Of Examples Of This Idiomatic Phrasal-Adjective…

READ THE FULL POST HERE!

(I Promise, No Click-Bait…  And If That’s Not “Clear-Cut”…  Then You Should Read The Full Post)


Have An Excellent Day!

😉

Aphorism: “Every Cloud Has A Silver Lining”


“Every Cloud Has A Silver Lining”

(Aphorism)


Today’s “Tid-Bit” is an idiomatic aphorism which is used to express that every situation which may be perceived as “bad” or un-pleasant, usually has some sort of hidden beneficial or advantageous aspect to it – even though it may not been seen or experienced presently.

This phrase is usually used to describe a situation which is happening or has already happened – or as a reminder to someone who is experiencing, or is about to experience an un-pleasant situation, so that the person can perceive the circumstances with a more optimistic attitude.


READ THE FULL POST AND WATCH THE VIDEO EXAMPLE HERE!

(I Promise, No Click-Bait…  Or You Can Send The Guys In The Video After Me)


Have An Excellent Day!

😉