(to) Get One’s Act Together

(to) “Get (one’s) Act Together”


This is an Idiomatic Verb Phrase which comes from the world of the performing arts:  Ballet, Theatre, Comedy, etc..  The word, “Act” in this phrase is referring specifically to one’s performance.  The Separable Phrasal-Verb, (to) “Get (something) Together”, is in-reference-to making that performance perfected and “in sync” with others involved in the performance.


To Get Your Act Together - GiveMeSomeEnglish!!!


But, Idiomatically, it means something a bit different.  So, to see how Iron-Man can help define this Idiomatic Verb Phrase


READ THE FULL POST HERE!

(I Promise, No Click-Bait…  Only Authentic English, and quite possibly a bit of inspiration)


“Teaching” vs “Learning”

“Teaching” vs “Learning”


What’s The Difference?


Theodore Roethke once wrote:

“A teacher is One who carries on his education in public.”


Think about your best classes in school.  Were they the ones where you were just being talked to or lectured for the entire time?  I doubt it.  A good teacher doesn’t merely “teach” – a good teacher is one who is activated; is part of the class…  A facilitator – but also…  one of the students.


It is my belief that:  if one stops learning (which is essentially impossible) – then your Life is over.

There is not some magical point where one just “knows it all”…

(well, actually there is, but for most people, it takes thousands of lifetimes to get there, and that’s a different story 😉)

…and then one just “turns around” and teaches it all to everyone else…  And if you think that there is (as far as being a “teacher” is concerned) then I certainly don’t want to be in your class! 😀

There is a point, however – in any person’s development – where one realizes how far he or she has come with the help of those “ahead” of them.

Those who “reached a hand back” to help her – who took the lead, to guide him.  That’s what a teacher does…  at least, that is what they should do…  “Lend A Hand” – “Take The Lead”…  Help, guide, and explain what it is that they have seen that those “behind” them can’t yet see from their vantage point.

There are so many possible ways in which learning can happen.  And if there is not any learning happening from behind the eyes of you – the teacher – then I would bet that there is not much learning going on behind the eyes of your students either.

It is a “Two-Way Street”


Just because “teaching” is happening, that does not mean that “learning” is also happening.


There are many ways to explore the options available to a teacher in every situation in a classroom setting.  And since each classroom and each student is different, there are endless possibilities.


Please Don’t Limit Your Self…  Or Your Students

They are Your Teacher As Well


(this post was started back in 2009…  when I didn’t know anything about teaching…  and updated yesterday…  when I am still learning)

🙂


Have a Great Day!

😉

Leading Motivated Learners: Dear Sucky Administrator

Leading Motivated Learners: Dear Sucky Administrator


I just found this little gem and thought that it was well worth spreading around.

Originally written by Tony Sinanis on the blog “Leading Motivated Learners”

(the only thing that I would add is that Tony did not need to start [and finish] this brilliant piece by apologizing… not in the least!)


Dear Sucky Administrator,

I am sorry for the choice of words but you know who you are and you are pretty sucky at your work as an educator and specifically as an educational leader. 

You are the administrator who gives the rest of us a bad name. You are the administrator who perpetuates the “Us vs. Them” feeling that permeates many a school community. You are the administrator who creates a “Fortress School” and sends the message to families that you are not interested in collaborating, sharing or being transparent about your practices. You are the administrator who spends more time in the office pushing papers and doing “important” work instead of being in classrooms and interacting with students and staff. You are the administrator who does not value relationships with the people around you and is only focused on numbers, appearances and making yourself look good. You are the administrator who doesn’t foster a sense of trust in your school. Basically, you are sucky at your job because you have lost the focus on what matters most in education – KIDS! 

Fortunately, it is not too late to turn yourself around and go from sucky to at least halfway decent. Here are some things to avoid in your attempt to exit “sucky-ville”…


1) The work of educating children is not about you… it is about creating a space where the educators are empowered to do what is in the best interest of EVERY child!

2) Do not take yourself so seriously – it is not all about you! Yes, take your work seriously and be passionate about what you do for kids but remember to smile and laugh – especially at yourself!

3) Get out of your office and talk to everyone around you! Talk to the secretaries, the nurse, the custodians, the teachers, the teacher aides, the bus drivers, the families and most importantly, the KIDS!

4) Stop isolating yourself and being so guarded and start sharing and being more transparent in your practices! If you are doing what is in the best interest of KIDS then you can be open about it and stand behind your actions and then being transparent should come easily. Remember, be a successful educator is about relational trust and building social capital!

5) Stress the learning and not just the leading or teaching! Is effective leadership and instruction (building-wide and within classrooms) critical? Yes! But, you need to be focused on the learning… the learning of your KIDS… the learning of your staff… the learning of the family members… and your own learning!

6) You are not a “fixed” entity and you have not reached the pinnacle! You still have a lot to learn and do… you have still have a lot to try and many things to fail at within your work… you still have to enhance your craft… you still have to get better and remember that you are a work in progress! And, if you have a chance, become a connected educator – it will change your world!

7) Stop implementing zero tolerance policies and rules based on one incident or what could go wrong! Every situation, child and incident is different so treat it that way. Treat mistakes as an opportunity to learn and grow and get better. For example, when a staff member or child or even you uses social media inappropriately don’t ban social media; instead, use it as an opportunity to teach a lesson about digital citizenship and developing a positive digital footprint.      

8) Stop putting up road blocks for your staff when they want to try and implement new things that might fail! Be the remover of road blocks… not the creator of them! Trust your staff and their expertise and get out of their way… unless they need your support or perspective and then offer it in a non-judgmental way!

9) Stop using Faculty Meetings as an opportunity to share information that could easily be shared in a memo, email or quick announcement. When you gather the staff, make it worth their time because it is precious!

10) Remember, your work as an administrator is not about you! Your work as an effective administrator is about advocating for the needs of those around you and always doing what is in the best interest of a child! Be the voice for those without one.

11) And lastly… model what you expect of those around… model what you would want for your own children if they were in your school!

So, I am sorry to call you out sucky administrator, but there are way too many of you out there in the world of education! The time has come to change and get better because the current landscape of public education is not a positive one and we need leaders who will fight for what is right for our many educational communities. 

Please understand that I know I have many shortcomings myself and plenty of things I am sucky at too but I will continue to work on those because I try hard each day to avoid becoming a sucky administrator!


Sincerely,


Tony Sinanis


So That’s That.  I enjoyed it, and I hope you did too.


Have An Excellent Day!

😉

A Brilliant Talk About The Use Of Language And Sound

The Use Of Language And Sound

This talk, while not being one of the tear-jerking emotional TED-talks, certainly contains some very interesting and brilliant points that should be of interest to, not only “language professionals”, but any human who is, in any way, interested in effective communication.


Enjoy…



What To Do With The Information


I feel that all teachers of The Common Tongue (or any branch of “traditional” English) should be incorporating into their teaching, the ideas that are stated in the first part of the talk about what the speaker refers to as “HAIL” – and ESPECIALLY using what he calls “The Seven Deadly Sins Of Speaking” to demonstrate what NOT to do when communicating with others.

Words, phrases, and habits of communication, which promote or practice any one of “The Seven Deadly Sins…” and/or do not practice the points of “HAIL“, are (in my opinion) nothing less than language pollution.

Language is the key to making any change in the world, whether it be beneficial or detrimental.  If we do not change the way we use our language, then we are not going to make any real or lasting change at all.


Finally…


What the speaker touches upon in the second half of the talk – about the musical techniques of using sound in communication – are not only pretty cool, but (I think) should also be considered just as much a part of language as vocabulary and grammar.

To use an analogy – one could play all the correct notes of Beethoven’s 9th in precisely the proper order, but without cadence, pitch, timbre, and most importantly… Love, it would probably be about as “moving” as a ring-tone.

So let’s bring the music back into language by actually incorporating the philosophies in this talk, and making them a reality.  For “Ideas Worth Spreading” are of no use at all… unless we put them into action.


Have An Excellent Day!

😉