“Today’s Tid-Bit” – Advertisement vs Commercial (“This” vs “That”)

“Advertisement” vs “Commercial”


Today’s “Tid-Bits” comes to us from the “This” vs “That” section of the GiveMeSomeEnglish!!! Lexis Portal.

We’ve already gone over the the differences between “Ad” vs “Advert” vs “Advertisement” in a previous post.  Today we’ll tackle the topic of “Advertisement” vs “Commercial”.


So What’s The Difference?

FIND OUT HERE

(Though This Is Technically An Advertisement, I Am Not Trying To Sell You Anything But Authentic English…  And It’s Free!!!)

😀


Have An Excellent Day!

😉

Advertisements

Un-Countable Noun – Grammar Lesson

“Un-Countable Noun”


An Un-Countable Noun is a Noun which represents things which can not be “counted” as individual units.  These are things like liquids, or anything that would be very difficult to “count”, and also include “abstract” things like feelings, thoughts, and emotions.


Grammar Steve - GiveMeSomeEnglish!!!


To learn more about Un-Countable Nouns (and why Steve is getting food poured on his head)…


Read The Full Post Here


Have An Excellent Day!

😉

Shopaholic – (“Yer Ing-glish Sux!!!” Vol. 1)

“Shopaholic”


This is a really stupid Slang Term which is used to describe a person who is addicted to shopping.  The use of the pseudo-suffix “-aholic” is an example of a rather un-intelligent use of language, as it is taken from the word “Alcoholic” – commonly used to refer to a person who is addicted to drinking alcohol.


Alcoholic - GiveMeSomeEnglish!!!


However, this is also wrong.  The word “Alcoholic” – by definition (and I don’t mean the one in the dictionaries), describes a person’s physical condition rather than that person’s addiction.


 WANNA KNOW WHY? – READ THE FULL POST


Have An Excellent Day!

😉

Adjective – Grammar Lesson

Adjective


An Adjective is a word which modifies a noun or a pronoun and sometimes other adjectives and adverbs.  It describe the nature and quality of those things.

It tells “how much“, “how many“, “what type“, “what size“, “what shape“, etc.


 BUT THERE IS MUCH MORE TO IT THAN THAT

READ THE FULL TEXT HERE


Have An Excellent Day!

😉

Grammar Lesson – “Abbreviation”

Abbreviation


The Grammatical Term “Abbreviation” is a term which refers to a shortened form of a word or (sometimes) phrase.


For Example:

Wisconsin (the state I grew up in) is abbreviated as WI

Previously It was abbreviated as Wisc. then Wis. and now simply as WI – notice that the periods disappeared and the abbreviations actually got abbreviated.  This is a convention of all the states in the United States.

The United States of America is abbreviated as USA or even more simply the US


FOR MORE FORMS OF ABBREVIATION

READ THE FULL POST HERE…


Have An Excellent Day!

😉

To ” Have The Makings Of Something ” – Idiomatic Adjectival Verb-Phrase

To Have The Makings Of...

(to) ” Have The Makings Of ” (Something)


Today’s “Tid-Bit” is an Idiomatic Adjectival Verb-Phrase (I bet you didn’t know there was such a thing…) which comes to us from the the GiveMeSomeEnglish!!! Lexis Portal.


(to) Have The Makings Of (something)…


Read On The Find Out

The Meaning and Usage of This Phrase


Have An Excellent Day!

😉

“Try And…” vs “Try To…”

Try And vs Try To


These two phrases (followed by some verb) are VERY often mistaken.  This is largely because in British English, it is much more common to say, “Try and…”

Now, don’t get me wrong.  This isn’t a “British vs American” thing here.  There are plenty of people all over the world who say it either, or BOTH ways.


“I’m going to *try and* explain this to you so that it makes sense.”

-Vs-

“I’m going to *try to* explain this to you so that it makes sense.”


“Okay, so what’s the problem?  Both of those sound good.  I hear people say it both ways all the time…  So?”

Read On To Know The Truth


Have An Excellent Day!

😉

“Agree” vs “Agree With”

Agree vs Agree With


There is no difference in the meaning between these two.  For, in order to “Agree”, it is necessary to do it “With” another.  Therefore, the only difference is in the usage.


Read More To Find Out How!


And that’s that!  Pretty simple huh?


Have An Excellent Day!

😉

“At The Beginning” vs “In The Beginning”

“At The Beginning” vs “In The Beginning”


These two phrases are very similar, and quite often they are used interchangeably, however there actually is a distinct difference between the two, and even though native speakers may use them both in the same way, they shouldn’t.


Read More To Find Out Why!


Have An Excellent Day!

😉