Adoption – Conversational Questions

Adoption

Here is a list of questions that can be used in your English lessons, regarding “Adoption”.  Obviously, this is not a complete list, but feel free to use it, add to it, or print it out and put it up for adoption (just make sure that it goes to a good home.)

Enjoy!


Conversational Questions About Adoption

  • Do you know anyone who was adopted as a child?
  • Do you know anyone who has adopted a child?
  • Do you know anyone who has “put up” a child for adoption?”
  • What are some reasons people choose to “put up” there child or children for adoption?
  • When do you think it is a good thing for children to be “put up” for adoption?
  • What are some of the reasons people choose to adopt?
  • What is the difference between domestic and international adoption?
  • What are the views of adoption in (your country)?
  • How would someone go about adopting a child in (your country)?
  • Where do people find children for adoption?
  • What happens to children that are not adopted?
  • Would you ever adopt a child?
    • Would you ever adopt a child of another race or culture?
    • If you adopted a child, would you want a boy or a girl?
    • Would you ever adopt a child who was no longer a baby?
    • Would you ever adopt a child who was a teenager?
  • Do you think brothers and sisters should remain together when adopted?
  • What do you think could be the negative effects of separating children during adoption?
  • Are adoptions common in (your country)?
  • What are some organizations that help people adopt children?
  • Do you think a child should be told if he or she was adopted?
    • Why or why not?
    • If so, is there a certain age that would be best for telling the child?
  • Should adopted children have the right to know their biological parents?
    • Why or why not?
    • In what cases can this be a bad thing?
    • What about if the biological parents want to remain anonymous?
  • Do you think that the biological parents have any responsibility to the child after they have been adopted?
  • How do you think you would feel if a child you adopted wanted to search for his or her biological parents?
    • Would you help them?
  • Do you think biological parents should have the right to keep their identity from the children they give up for adoption?
    • Why or why not?
    • In what cases do you think this is a good idea?
  • If an adopted child wants to find his or her biological parents, do you think that the adoptive parents should help them?
  • When do you think it is a bad idea for a child to find and/or meet his or her birth parents?
  • Should families with birth children also adopt?
  • Do you think the “real” parent is the biological parent or the adoptive parent?
  • What makes a parent a “real” parent?
  • Should adoptions be between children and families of the same race and or culture?
    • In what ways could these types of adoptions be good?
    • In what ways could these types of adoptions be bad?
      • What kinds of problems could arise?
  • Should adoptive parents maintain the adopted child’s cultural identify?
  • Should same-sex couples be allowed to adopt?
    • In what ways could they be better parents?
    • In what ways could they be worse parents?
  • Should a single man or woman be able to adopt a child?
    • In what ways could he or she be a better parent?
    • In what ways could he or she be a worse parent?
  • Are there certain people who should not be able to adopt?
    • Who?
    • Why not?
  • Are there people in certain careers who should be allowed to adopt?
    • Why or why not?
    • If so, which careers?  Why?
  • In (your country) are the legal rights of an adopted child different from that of a birth child?
  • Do you know of any other countries in which they are?
  • Do you know of any legal consequences of adopting a child from a different race or country?
  • Do you know of any legal benefits of adopting a child from a different race or country?
  • Why, do you think, more people don’t adopt children?
  • What factors go into making a family a “Family”?
    • Genetics?
    • Environment?
    • Anything else?
  • Do you support an open adoption policy where the birth parents can choose to be involved in the child’s life?
  • Do you believe there is discrimination within the adoption organizations and/or adoption policies?
  • Should there be an age restriction for the adoptive parents?
    • Why or Why not?
    • If so, what age?
  • How do you think you would react if you found out you were adopted?
  • Do you think you would want to find your biological parents?
  • If a couple is not able to have a child of their own, do you think it they should adopt or to use scientific methods to have a child?
  • Do you think that couples that can have a child of their own should consider adoption?
    • Why or why not?
  • Should prospective parents in adoption cases be required to do a parenting course?
  • Are there any risks when adopting a child?
  • What risk?  Why?
  • Do you think that adopted children should feel especially loved and wanted?
  • Should people be allowed to adopt children of a different race and/or culture?
    • What are some good points and bad points of this kind of adoption?
  • How would you feel if you found out you were adopted?Do you it is preferable to adopt or to use artificial reproduction technology?
    • What would you do?
  • What do you think about celebrity adoptions?
    • In what ways do you think this is a good thing?
    • In what ways do you think this is a bad thing?
    • How many children do you think is too many to adopt?
    • In large adopted families, what do you think about mixing races?
      • In what ways could this be good?
      • In what ways could this be bad?
    • What do you think about mixing ages and/or sexes of the adopted children?
      • In what ways could this be good?
      • In what ways could this be bad?

Informational Disclaimer

As stated above…

This is by no means a complete list…

The items on this list are a combination of ideas compiled from many sources, including my own personal experience and inspiration. These are basic questions that anyone with enough time and brainpower can think of.

Therefore, I do not claim ownership of these ideas, nor do I believe that anyone else can either. I merely took the time to compile, arrange, and present the information.

If this list looks similar to any others on the internet or in a text-book, it is because these are good ideas for a conversational class on this particular topic, and these questions can be found in numerous different places. The reason that they appear here is because I have compiled this list for my own personal use and have also made it available for anyone else who may find it useful in their studies or teaching practice.

Information used for educational purposes should be free for ALL, for the sake of education, and the overall advancement of Human-Kind. It is in this same light, that I invite anyone who wishes – to copy, cut, paste, and otherwise use this page for their own educational or instructional needs…

…There is nothing new under the sun…

(None can claim ownership…  All are rightful heirs of knowledge.)


Have An Excellent Day!

😉

“Things Related To Me” Ice-Breaker

Classroom Ice-Breaker – “Things Related To Me”


I'm A Freakin' Teacher Dammit!!! - theTEFLblog


If you have been teaching for a while, then you have probably heard about this one, or something like it (although maybe not with the same name.)

In fact, since I’ve been teaching, I haven’t really come across many “new” ice-breaker activities.  They are all just regurgitated with new names and presented as original material by people on their websites…  Kind of like this… except I make no claim to originating this activity.


So why re-post it?


Well, essentially for the reason that blogs and websites come and go, and not everyone sees the same blogs and websites as everyone else.  But more than that, I post this because I have used this particular activity in nearly every new class that I’ve had, and not only does it work (for me), but it can be altered to suit both your needs as the instructor/coach/teacher and the needs of the students/learners.


So get to the point already!


(This lesson is for “in-class” lessons, and probably wouldn’t work too well in an on-line class without some sort of screen-sharing capabilities.)

  • Write or Draw approx. 5-10 things on the black-board/white-board
    • These “things” (if not drawn) can be a combination of words, names, single numbers, dates, years, etc.
  • Inform the students/learners that each thing is, somehow, directly related to you.
  • The students/learners then have to guess how theyare related to you.
    • The method of how you can decide who gets to guess is completely up to you.  You can:
      • Go in turn, around the class
      • Have the students/learners raise their hands
      • Spin a spinner, roll a dice, etc.

Things to consider:


  • Make sure that the students/learners use proper question forms (rather than just making a statement with rising intonation at the end.)
  • You may decide how to give hints.
  • You may want to do just one thing at a time and the person who guesses correctly has to put something on the board.  Then the other students/learners all get a chance to play along.  This is a great way for people to get to know each other.
    • Utilizing a method such as this is a great way to gather information to be used for a “Find Someone Who…” exercise to use in the next class.

However you wish to alter this exercise is, of course, completely up to you.  The only time that I have had any difficulty with this activity is when the students were just really really shy…  (Then I just had to act goofy and give lots of hints.)

I hope that this is helpful for you.


Have An Excellent Day!

😉

Accidents In The Home – Conversational Questions

Accidents In the Home

Here is a list of questions that can be used in your English lessons, regarding “Accidents In The Home”.  Obviously, this is not a complete list, but feel free to use it, add to it, or print it out and burn it (just not inside your home.)

Enjoy!


  • What is the most dangerous thing in your home? 
  • How can your home be made less dangerous?
  • What is the most dangerous thing in your home for a child?
  • How can that thing be made less dangerous?
  • What is the most dangerous thing in your home for an elderly person?
  • How can it be made less dangerous?
  • What dangers can be found in the kitchen?
  • What are some things in the kitchen that can cause accidents?
  • Have you ever had an accident in the kitchen that resulted in an injury?
  • What can be done to prevent kitchen accidents?
  • What can a parent do to “childproof” a kitchen?
  • What can be done to make kitchens more safe for everyone?
  • What dangers can be found in bathrooms that can cause accidents?
  • What can be done to prevent accidents in the bathroom?
  • What can a parent do to “childproof” a bathroom?
  • What can be done to make bathrooms more safe for everyone?
  • What dangers can be found outside the home (in the yard or garden) that can cause accidents?
  • What can be done to prevent accidents in the yard or garden?
  • What can a parent do to “childproof” the yard or garden?
  • What can be done to make the yard or garden more safe for everyone?
  • What other dangers can be found in a home:  in bedrooms, laundry rooms, garages, and living areas?
  • What can be done throughout the house to prevent accidents?
  • What can a parent do to “childproof” the different rooms of the home?
  • What can be done to make homes more safe in general?
  • Where in your home do you have a first aid kit?
    • What do you have in it?
  • Where are these items found in a house; how can they be dangerous; to whom can they be dangerous, and what can someone do to lessen the dangers they present?
    • hot pots/pans
    • hot curling iron
    • knife
    • window
    • iron
    • medicines
    • gasoline
    • pool
    • insecticides
    • bleach
    • cleaners
    • natural gas
    • balcony
    • toilets
    • staircase
    • oven/stove
    • stool
    • ladder
    • yard tools
    • fireplace
    • bathtub
    • swing set/playground
    • sliding glass door
    • electronic equipment
    • cleaning supplies
    • loose carpet
    • slippery floor
    • glass table
    • table with sharp edges & corners
    • hairdryer
  • What do you need to do if…?
    • you cut your finger preparing food?
    • you fall down and can not move or get up?
    • your child drinks chemicals? (cleaners, bleach, etc.)
    • the toilet is overflowing?
    • there is a fire in the kitchen?
    • there is a fire anywhere in the home?
  • How do you call for police, paramedic, fire help?
  • What is the phone number for emergency help?

Informational Disclaimer

As stated above…

This is by no means a complete list…

The items on this list are a combination of ideas compiled from many sources, including my own personal experience and inspiration. These are basic questions that anyone with enough time and brainpower can think of.

Therefore, I do not claim ownership of these ideas, nor do I believe that anyone else can either. I merely took the time to compile, arrange, and present the information.

If this list looks similar to any others on the internet or in a text-book, it is because these are good ideas for a conversational class on this particular topic, and these questions can be found in numerous different places. The reason that they appear here is because I have compiled this list for my own personal use and have also made it available for anyone else who may find it useful in their studies or teaching practice.

Information used for educational purposes should be free for ALL, for the sake of education, and the overall advancement of Human-Kind. It is in this same light, that I invite anyone who wishes – to copy, cut, paste, and otherwise use this page for their own educational or instructional needs…

…There is nothing new under The Sun…

(None can claim ownership… All are rightful heirs to knowledge.)


Have An Excellent Day!

😉